Wednesday, May 27, 2009

When pride ought to be not a sin: Flag Days - May28 to June 12

It’s one of the most ubiquitous objects in our country. It is mandated to have a place of prominence in all towns and cities- from the most populous to the most distant. It brings people together and can literally make life stand still. It represents the courage, unity, passion, strength of a proud people.

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The Philippine Flag.

From its humble beginnings in Hong Kong thanks to the skillful hands of Marcela Agoncillo to its unfettered waving in EDSA in 1986, its ascent in Mt. Everest, and even during the regular flag-raising ceremonies all over the country, the Philippine flag has come to symbolize the indomitable Filipino spirit, our triumph amidst adversity, our faith in ourselves and in each other.

Let the Philippine flag fly free as we celebrate the Flag Days from May 28th to June 12th of every year. May 28, 1898 is said by historians as the first time the national tri-color was ever waved, hoisted in victory by General Emilio Aguinaldo as a sign of victory against the Spaniards in Bo. Alapan, Imus, Cavite. On June 12, 1898, the national flag was formally unfurled from the balcony of Gen. Aguinaldo’s home in Kawit, Cavite during the proclamation of Philippine independence.

Each home, business establishment, government office, and all institutions are encouraged to reverently display the national flag. Here are some reminders (which should go without saying but I will share anyway) from The National Historical Institute about the proper display of the Philippine National Flag:

1. The national flag alone should be displayed in all public offices, buildings, official residences, public squares and institutions of learning everyday of the year. The flag should be displayed in the open only from sunrise to sunset, except on places designated by law and therefore should be properly illuminated.

2. When flown from a flagpole, the flag should have its blue stripe on top in time of peace and red on top in time of war.

3. The flag should not be displayed on horizontal position or hung fastened by its fly. The fly portion of the flag should be free to move.

4. When displayed vertically, the triangle should be on top. The blue field should be to the right (left of the observer) in time of peace, and the red field to the right (left of the observer) in time of war.

5. The flag should not be used as part of or as a whole of a costume.

6. The flag should not be displayed in cockpits, dance halls and centers of vice.

7. The flag should not be used as unveiling material in unveiling ceremonies.

8. It is prohibited to add any word, figure, mark, picture, design, drawings, advertisement, or imprint of any nature on the National Flag.

9. It is prohibited for the National Flag to be used or displayed or be made part of any advertisement or infomercial.

10. Tattered, faded or worn-out flags should be replaced immediately. They should be disposed off or destroyed privately, preferably by burning.

There are more little-known but must-know facts and regulations about the Philippine flag, the Philippine National Anthem, and other national symbols which you can find in The National Historical Institute website. If many of us can be well-read and walking encyclopedias with regard to the latest showbiz scandals, all the more I think we can and should be masters of anything and everything our culture and heritage.

Mabuhay ang Pilipinas! =]

1 comment:

  1. I think Natioanl Pride isn't a bad thing. It can be quite healhy when reviving and maintaining culture and art of a country. It ony gets ugly when one nation whants to impose it's rules on another, that is when nationalism gets dangerous. Your flag up there is beautiful and I lvoe knowing the meaning of different flags.

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